Archive for March, 2019

  • Phantom call still thrills

    Date: 2019.03.21 | Category: 南京夜网 | Response: 0

    MAKYBE Diva, the great Phar Lap, Light Fingers and Americain are fighting it out to win the Melbourne Cup.
    Nanjing Night Net

    That was the phantom call with which race caller Bryan Martin thrilled residents of Osborne Nursing Home on Friday as part of the Emirates Melbourne Cup tour.

    Mr Martin, who will call his 26th Melbourne Cup this year, took residents through what would be a race for the ages, with some of the greatest winners of all time.

    At the same time he explained how race callers prepare, what they go through during the race, their techniques and how they build the excitement during their call.

    “The most important thing is to get it right,” he said.

    “You only have one chance and it only lasts about three and a half minutes.

    “It is such a special race that now has major international attention. Everyone wants to win the Melbourne Cup.”

    Mr Martin was joined by Mark de Mestre, the grandson of local master trainer Etienne de Mestre, who won five Melbourne Cups.

    Mr de Mestre spoke of the local connections with the race that stops a nation and in particular his grandfather’s win in the first two Melbourne Cups with Archer in 1861-62.

    This year the winner will receive $4 million in prize money and the 18-carat gold cup, valued at $175,000, a far cry from 1861, when Etienne de Mestre received a gold watch.

    “Unfortunately we don’t know what became of that watch,” Mr de Mestre said.

    “It’s not in the family’s possession.”

    However, all these years later, and despite numerous offers, the family still retains the rights to the all-black colours under which Etienne de Mestre raced.

    During the visit residents got to hold and pose for photos with this year’s cup.

    For the record Phar Lap won in a photo finish.

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  • Community unites against family violence

    Date: 2019.03.21 | Category: 南京夜网 | Response: 0

    Police urge community to stand against family violence
    Nanjing Night Net

    STEADFAST: Chairperson of the Shoalhaven Domestic Violence Committee Sue Davies (left), Senior Constable Doug Nyholm and Domestic Violence Liaison Officers Senior Constable Neil Allen and Senior Constable Meisha Vallentine get behind the Say No To Domestic Violence campaign.

    SHOALHAVEN police are backing the community based Say No to Domestic Violence campaign.

    Fay Lewis, a member of the Shoalhaven Domestic Violence Committee, came up with the idea last month and has been busy working on the project ever since.

    She met with local police last week.

    Ms Lewis wants to flood the region with signs and posters featuring words like “Shoalhaven says no” and “Say no to domestic violence”.

    Nowra Domestic Violence Intervention Service co-ordinator Sue Davies urged the community to support the project.

    “We want everyone to take ownership of the issue – men women and children,” she said.

    The project will follow White Ribbon Day and the items will be on display during the United Nations 16 days of action.

    Meanwhile, NSW police have repeat offences in their sights.

    The challenge is still mostly ahead of them in South Coast local area commands (LACs) but they hope a turning point may be imminent.

    Lake Illawarra area commander Superintendent Wayne Starling, who previously headed the Shoalhaven command, told Fairfax Media “despite numerous programs and community engagements we still have a high rate of repeat victims”.

    LAC crime managers in neighbouring Shoalhaven and Far South Coast agree with Superintendent Starling that repeat violence is a concern in their regions.

    “In Lake Illawarra family violence accounts for approximately 40 per cent of the work general duty police officers do on the road,” Superintendent Starling said.

    He and his adjacent LAC colleagues say two new strategies introduced in recent weeks may result in a decrease.

    Police can now record video statements from consenting victims made at the time and location of incidents and introduce them to court, in a new procedure known as domestic violence evidence-in-chief or DVEC.

    Since July 1, police have also used the complementary two-part domestic violence safety assessment tool (DVSAT). Officers ask 25 risk identification questions with five underlying themes to people when an incident occurs.

    Questions are about the background and current environment of the offender or partner, the threat of violence, the dynamics of the relationship, the presence of children and whether there is sexual behaviour or assault.

    Police assess the level of and reasons for victims’ fears and whether serious threats warrant immediate referral to other agencies to protect them and reduce risk of further harm.

    “DVSAT targets repeat victimisation and is better than the old way of police going on gut feeling,” said NSW Southern Region sponsor for domestic and family violence, Superintendent Rod Smith.

    Mr Smith oversees 11 commands on such matters including the entire South Coast and is Monaro local area commander at Queanbeyan where numbers of repeat offenders appear to be down.

    He said among 170 reported domestic related assaults in 12 months of the 2015 financial year, the number of repeat offences fluctuated between 7 and 10 per cent.

    “We try to focus heavily on preventing repeat offences and we’re absolutely happy with these numbers, it’s highly encouraging,” Superinten-dent Smith said.

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  • OBITUARY: Robert Stephen Connell

    Date: 2019.03.21 | Category: 南京夜网 | Response: 0

    After the war, Bob Connell married Winifred Currie.‘‘BOB’’ Connell, a former World War II bomber pilot and Freeman of the City of Port Stephens, passed away on August 10. He was 95.
    Nanjing Night Net

    His story is one of war and peace, enduring love, family, community and mateship.

    Born to Peter and Florence Connell in Gunnedah on February 3, 1920, Bob and his brothers Tom, Les and Ray moved around the state before the ‘‘railway family’’ settled in Ingleburn, where Peter was the station master.

    After completing his leaving certificate at Parramatta High School, Bob landed a job as a stenographer at Ingleburn Council. It was following a promotion to junior clerk at Baulkham Hills Shire Council that he met a lovely young typist called Winifred Currie.

    Bob’s chair had increasingly crept closer to Win’s, and he even volunteered to do some of her typing in a bid to get to know her better.

    It was the beginning of a beautiful friendship, a love that would survive the distance of war as well as the trials of time.

    As a young Boy Scout who stood as part of a guard of honour for famous aviators Sir Charles Kingsford Smith and Charles Ulm, Bob had become enchanted by planes. So when the war broke out, the Air Force beckoned.

    His father had been against helping the British, so Bob told him he’d been ‘‘called up’’ and, at 19, went ahead and forged Peter’s signature on his application.

    Bob Connell was a fighter in World War II.

    Bob trained in Narrandera and then Canada.

    Now engaged, Bob and Win had said their goodbyes. Five years would pass before they would see each other again, but both were prolific letter writers.

    Their words to each other throughout that time apart offer incredible insights into their lives, as well as the war.

    Having earned his ‘‘wings’’ on multi-engine aircraft, Bob was promoted to sergeant and soon set out in a ship convoy across the Atlantic from Halifax, bound for England. They left with 40 to 50 ships, but only 27 arrived in Liverpool.

    ‘‘It is a most frightening sound, an explosion in the middle of the night,’’ Bob said in his memoirs.

    ‘‘Particularly when the ship gives a shudder, as it did one night when a petrol tanker some four or five ships away took a direct hit. The explosion and the flames said it all for the crew.

    ‘‘There just wasn’t any help available or anything you could do but just watch and be thankful it wasn’t you.’’

    In 1942, Bob, along with other Australians, was volunteered for the Desert Air Force. For that he trained in Kenya on light bomber aircraft known as Blenheims, and later, ‘‘Baltimore’’ bombers.

    He was posted to Egypt where he was assigned to the UK’s Royal Air Force in 223 Squadron. He soon discovered that sergeant pilots – particularly ‘‘colonial’’ ones – were treated with disdain. Their British officers told them they were ‘‘expendable’’.

    The war took Bob to Tunisia, Malta, Sicily and Italy.

    ‘‘Crews averaged two or three raids a day,’’ Bob said in his memoirs.

    ‘‘Between raids we would stretch out on the sand beneath the sheltering wings and watch other aircraft form up to conduct another raid. Day followed day as we hammered the stubborn Afrika Korps.

    ‘‘We were proud to be part of the whole operation.

    ‘‘Rommel [German general commander of the Afrika Korps] later admitted in his writings that our daylight bombing was one of the crucial factors contributing to his defeat.’’

    Bob took part in 78 consecutive operational missions – the highest number of missions recorded by a 223 Squadron crew.

    Upon his return to Australia, Bob and Win married.

    The couple had three sons – Geoff, Phillip and Stephen.

    From 1957, Bob held the position of shire clerk – known now as general manager – of Dungog and then Port Stephens until he retired in 1980.

    Throughout his years in the region he led the Civil Defence (now SES), joined the local Rotary Clubs and was secretary of the Dungog Scouting movement.

    He was also a good cricketer and played in the local competitions.

    He became involved in local RSL, golf and bowling clubs.

    Bob Connell worked as shire clerk for Dungog and then Port Stephens.

    In 1977, he was awarded the Member of the British Empire (MBE) for community services.

    Following retirement, Bob became a civil celebrant, marrying many friends and family members.

    Bob and Win travelled widely, and remained based at their family home in Raymond Terrace for more than 50 years. Sadly, they were burgled several times.

    ‘‘He had his original war medals stolen,’’ son Geoff Connell said.

    ‘‘But when he got compensation for all of their things, he donated the money to the local youth refuge.’’

    ‘‘That was pretty much the type of guy he was. He always had a sense of generosity towards other people.’’

    Geoff said Bob had certainly kept them all on the straight and narrow while they were growing up.

    ‘‘I always feel with those guys of that vintage, that they went away and they fought, and when they came home they had a real sense of now we are going to build the nation.

    ‘‘And they did.’’

    Win passed away in 2013.

    Bob was lonely, but battled on in his solid, stoic way.

    The staff at the Claire Castle Hotel in Raymond Terrace became like a second family.

    ‘‘They basically adopted him,’’ Geoff laughed.

    ‘‘He used to ride his electric scooter down there every day to have a couple of beers. They were unbelievably good to him.’’

    Geoff said Bob and his war mates had been a tight bunch.

    Their experiences and the constant threat during those five years at war had welded them together.

    ‘‘In some of his letters he talks about flying side-by-side in formation, and a plane beside him would just disappear. All of that was very real.

    ‘‘Afterwards they partied hard, and they were entitled to.’’

    He will be remembered by his children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren and friends as a kind, caring and generous man who was a shining example of his generation’s extraordinary character and determination.

  • Netball grand final – A gradeGALLERY

    Date: 2019.03.21 | Category: 南京夜网 | Response: 0

    Netball grand final – A grade | GALLERY Railways run onto the court in preperation of the game.
    Nanjing Night Net

    Vikings run onto the court in preperation of the game.

    Vikings huddle before the game.

    Railways ready to start the game.

    Vikings C Courtney Woolford and Vikings GA Casey Lukich.

    Railways GA Erin Pascoe and Vikings GD Mikala Fuller.

    Vikings C Courtney Woolford.

    Vikings WA Belinda Myles.

    Railways GA Erin Pascoe.

    Railways GS Peyton Fuller Vikings GD Mikala Fuller.

    Railways GA Erin Pascoe shoots the ball Railways GS Peyton Fuller waits for the rebound.

    Railways GS Peyton Fuller.

    Railways GS Peyton Fuller and Vikings GK Jasmyn Hewett.

    Vikings GA Casey Lukich Railways GD Angela McAuliffe.

    Vikings GS Mia Grantham.

    Vikings GA Casey Lukich.

    Vikings GS Mia Grantham.

    Railways GS Peyton Fuller.

    Vikings C Courtney Woolford.

    Vikings C Courtney Woolford.

    Vikings C Courtney Woolford.

    Vikings C Courtney Woolford Vikings GK Jasmyn Hewett.

    Vikings GS Mia Grantham.

    Vikings GA Casey Lukich.

    Railways GA Erin Pascoe Vikings GD Mikala Fuller.

    Vikings GA Casey Lukich.

    Vikings GA Casey Lukich.

    Railways C Claire Schupelius and Vikings C Courtney Woolford.

    Vikings WA Belinda Myles Railways WD Billy Elley.

    Vikings GS Mia Grantham.

    Vikings GA Casey Lukich Railways GD Angela McAuliffe.

    Railways C Claire Schupelius.

    Railways C Claire Schupelius.

    Railways C Claire Schupelius.

    Railways GS Peyton Fuller and Vikings GD Mikala Fuller.

    Vikings GS Mia Grantham.

    Railways C Claire Schupelius.

    Railways C Claire Schupelius.

    Railways GS Peyton Fuller.

    Railways C Claire Schupelius Vikings GK Jasmyn Hewett.

    Vikings GK Jasmyn Hewett Railways GS Peyton Fuller.

    Railways GS Peyton Fuller.

    Railways C Claire Schupelius.

    Railways GD Angela McAuliffe.

    Railways WA Erin Pascoe Vikings WD Erin Egel.

    Railways GD Angela McAuliffe Vikings GA Casey Lukich.

    Railways GD Angela McAuliffe Vikings GA Casey Lukich.

    Railways GK Ammy Singleton.

    Railways C Claire Schupelius Railways WA Maddison Chapman.

    Vikings GS Mia Grantham.

    Railways GS Peyton Fuller.

    Vikings GA Casey Lukich is wheeled off the court after being injured.

    Vikings GA Casey Lukich is wheeled off the court after being injured.

    Vikings celebrate their win.

    Vikings celebrate their win.

    Vikings celebrate their win.

    Vikings celebrate their win.

    Vikings celebrate their win.

    Vikings celebrate their win.

    Vikings celebrate their win.

    Vikings celebrate their win.

    Vikings celebrate their win.

    2015 A Grade premiership team Vikings: Courtney Woolford, Belinda Myles, Mia Grantham, Celeste Ticehurst, Bianca Reid, Casey Lukich, Jasmyn Hewett, Mikala Fuller, Tiana Freeman and Erin Egel.

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  • He did it: ‘Ion man’, 80, blitzes race

    Date: 2019.03.21 | Category: 南京夜网 | Response: 0

    Leslie Ion, 80, of Surf Beach, completed the the 2015 The Canberra Times 10km Fun Run in less minutes than his age.A Surf Beach octogenarian has run the 10km Canberra Times Fun Run in less minutes than his age.
    Nanjing Night Net

    Leslie Ion, who celebrated his 80th birthday on Thursday, finished the Sunday, September 6, event in 78 minutes, well inside his goal of 80 minutes.

    Running in the 70 to 99-year-old age group, Mr Ion finished 9th of 11 contenders.

    Of a total of 1526 runners who finished the 10km course, Mr Ion came in at 1388 position.

    He was 716th of 762 male runners.

    Mr Ion crossed the finish line flanked by four generations of his family.

    He ran alongside his grandchildren and great-children wearing “Grumpy Old Man T-shirts”.

    He said it meant “everything” to have them there.

    “Sometimes you need a shirt to show your support,” his granddaughter Heidi Yates said.

    RELATED CONTENT: Surf Beach ‘Ion Man’

    This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.